Experts Call for Authoritative Database on Drug Overdoses at Australian Music Festivals

Experts Call for Authoritative Database on Drug Overdoses at Australian Music Festivals

So, would the creation of an authoritative database really cut down on drug overdoses at a music festival?  Or, would it lead to harsher and more restrictive measures against festivalgoers?

Following the deaths of two young adult festivalgoers over the weekend, experts in Australia have called for the creation of a database to prevent more deaths in the country.

But, what happened?

A 23-year-old male and a 21-year-old female festivalgoer overdosed at the Defqon.1 festival held in Sydney.

Hundreds more sought help after consuming drugs.  13 went to the hospital.  3 remain in critical condition.

Authorities later charged 10 people for sneaking drugs into the festival.  A pair of 17-year-old girls reportedly carried 120 MDMA capsules into Defqon.1.  After conducting 355 searches, officers found 69 festivalgoers with illegal substances.  Over 30,000 had attended the EDM festival on Saturday.

A notable Australian politician immediately condemned the news.

In a statement to the Sydney Morning Herald, Gladys Berejiklan, Premier of the Australian state of New South Wales, vowed to shut down Defqon.1.

In the past 5 years, five people have died of drug overdoses at major music festivals across the country.

Experts warn, however, that simply shutting down music festivals doesn’t actually deal with the drug problem.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics releases data each year showing how many people die from drug-related incidents.  Yet, experts argue the data doesn’t show how many people overdose at large-scale public events.